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- Superbug MRSA on rise in hospital outpatients, US - 2.2
- Routine HIV screening in community boosts HIV testing - 2

Community articles

ReWalk - First and Only Exoskeleton Cleared by FDA in US
Exoskeleton leader ReWalk Robotics announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the company’s ReWalk Personal System for use at home and in the community.

E-cigarette - 10 new brands and 240 new flavors every month
10 new brands and more than 240 new flavours of e-cigarette are coming to market every month, reveals a new study. The study is one of nine pieces of research on e-cigarettes to come out of the State and Community Tobacco Control Research (SCTC) Initiative, funded by the US National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health.

Electronic health records improve patient care quality
A new study provides compelling evidence that electronic health records (EHRs) enhance the quality of patient care in a community-based setting with multiple payers, which is representative of how medicine is generally practiced across the United States.

Misoprostol not effective in women during labor
There is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of a drug that is being used increasingly to prevent life-threatening bleeding in women after giving birth in community settings in low income countries.

HPV vaccine reduces HPV infection even in unvaccinated
The HPV vaccine not only has resulted in a decrease in human papillomavirus infection in immunized teens but also in teens who were not immunized. The study is believed to be the first to show a substantial decrease in HPV infection in a community setting as well as herd protection ? a decrease in infection rates among unimmunized individuals that occurs when a critical mass of people in a community is immunized against a contagious disease.

Largest human cancer genome data released in US
A comprehensive human cancer genome data is released in US for free access by the global scientific community. The amount of information released more than doubles the volume of high-coverage, whole genome data currently available from all human genome sources combined.

Smoking causes stroke to occur 10 years before
Not only are smokers twice as likely to have strokes, they are almost a decade younger than non-smokers when they have them, according to a study presented today at the Canadian Stroke Congress.

Marked reduction of HIV among circumcised adult men
Researchers presenting late breaking research on the final day of the 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) have focussed on new studies in the field of circumcision, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and antiretroviral treatment. The IAS 2011 conference has been attended by over 5000 researchers, clinicians and community leaders since Sunday in Rome.

Medicaid plans owned by public companies have higher administrative costs
A new Commonwealth Fund report finds that Medicaid managed care plans that are owned by publicly traded for-profit companies whose primary line of business is managing Medicaid enrollees spent an average of 14 percent of premiums on administrative costs, compared with an average of only 10 percent spent by non-publicly traded plans owned by groups of health care providers, health systems, community health centers, or clinics.

Vitamin D deficiency in pneumonia patients risky
A new study published in the journal Respirology reveals that adult patients admitted to the hospital with pneumonia are more likely to die if they have Vitamin D deficiency.

Most blacks report calling a friend when facing symptoms of stroke
Most African-Americans report calling a friend instead of 911 when faced with the symptoms of a stroke, according to a new study that surveyed those hospitalized for a stroke.

New research to drive novel ways of treating and preventing HIV
The unwillingness of the global AIDS community to accept the status quo is fuelling a new era of scientific innovation to drive novel ways of treating and preventing HIV, organizers of the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) taking place in Vienna, Austria said today.

Hospital superbug MRSA diffused by patients
A new study finds that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ?responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections including blood poisoning and pneumonia and a particular problem in hospitals ? occurs in distinct geographical clusters across Europe, indicating that MRSA is being diffused by patients moving between hospitals rather than spreading freely in the community.

Routine HIV screening in community boosts HIV testing
UCSF researchers have that found routinely offering rapid HIV tests to patients in community health centers can significantly increase the number of patients screened for HIV.

Fast, accurate urine test for pneumonia
Scientists are reporting a discovery of the potential basis for a urine test to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), a difficult-to-diagnose disease that is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

Yoga benefits back pain patients
People with chronic low back problems who do yoga also do better at overcoming pain and depression than people treated conventionally for back pain, a West Virginia University study funded by the National Institutes of Health shows.

MRSA may accompany hospital patients to home
Infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) appears relatively common among patients discharged from the hospital into home health care, revealed by researchers. In addition, about one-fifth of infected patients may transmit the organism to other people in their households.

Binge drinking on rise in colleges, US
Alcohol is sometimes seen as part and parcel of college life, but there are programs that can significantly reduce students' risky drinking, according to a series of studies in a special college drinking supplement of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Ontario's primary health care reforms questioned
Ontario has invested millions of dollars into the healthcare system in response to a serious doctor shortage. But despite improvements in primary care, a study out of the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) has found Ontario's chronically sick and poor are the least likely to benefit from the investments.

Computer programs help for smokers trying to quit
Trying to quit cigarettes but don't know how? A new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, suggests that Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs are worth a try, and fortunately during these tough economic times, many of them are free.

Genetic factors may predict depression in heart disease patients
Individuals with heart disease are twice as likely to suffer from depression as the general population, an association the medical community has largely been unable to explain. Now, a new study by researchers at The Miriam Hospital, in conjunction with The Montr?al Heart Institute, University of Montr?al and McGill University, reveals there may be genetic variations that contribute to depression in heart disease patients.

Half a glass of wine a day boosts life
Drinking up to half a glass of wine a day may boost life expectancy by five years-at least in men-suggests research published ahead of print in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Single Payer Bill SB 810 passed Senate Health Committee, California
In a room packed with nurses from the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee, California School Employees Association members, and community healthcare activists from across the state, California's latest bill to establish a universal, single payer health reform passed its first legislative test Wednesday afternoon.

Nanotechnology used to probe effectiveness of antibiotics
A group of researchers led by scientists from the London Centre for Nanotechnology, in collaboration with a University of Queensland researcher, have discovered a way of using tiny nano-probes to help understand how an antibiotic is effective against bacteria.

National Black HIV AIDS Awareness and Information Day
The scourge of HIV/AIDS, which continues to affect the African-American community disproportionately, highlights the importance of a comprehensive strategy to address the U.S. epidemic.

Early detection methods for pancreatic cancer urgently needed
The following is a statement in response to the breaking news about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from Julie Fleshman, President and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, the only national organization creating hope in a comprehensive way through research, patient support, community outreach and advocacy for a cure.

23andMe announces breast cancer initiative
23andMe, Inc., the industry leader in personal genetics, announced that it is embarking on a world-wide effort to assemble the largest cohort of women whose lives have been impacted by breast cancer and to build an infrastructure, based on genetics, that will accelerate consumer-based research of the disease.

Mothers less likely to vaccinate daughters against HPV
U.S. mothers report they are less likely to vaccinate daughters under age 13 against human papillomavirus virus (HPV), even though the vaccine is recommended for girls at age 11 and 12, it's incumbent upon the healthcare community to work to improve mom's acceptance of the vaccination for younger daughters, say researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center who conducted the study.

MRSA and community acquired staph pneumonia more common
Preliminary research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that community acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium may be more common than originally suspected, including that caused by antibiotic resistant strains.

Quit smoking in pregnancy to have easy going child
Giving up smoking during pregnancy may boost the chances of giving birth to an easy going child, indicates research in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Helping older people live safely and independently
Complex interventions such as preventive home visits and community-based care after hospital discharge can help improve physical function and maintain independent living in older people, according to a Bristol University study of more than 90,000 older people published in this week's edition of the Lancet. The authors also advise against withdrawal of existing well-developed services for older people.

Do animals think like autistic savants?
When Temple Grandin argued that animals and autistic savants share cognitive similarities in her best-selling book Animals in Translation (2005), the idea gained steam outside the community of cognitive neuroscientists.

Studies highlight MRSA evolution and resilience
Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are caused primarily by a single strain-USA300-of an evolving bacterium that has spread with "extraordinary transmissibility" throughout the United States during the past five years, according to a new study led by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists. CA-MRSA, an emerging public health concern, typically causes readily treatable soft-tissue infections such as boils, but also can lead to life-threatening conditions that are difficult to treat.

Decline in smoking in Minnesota Adolescent
New research in the December issue of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, shows that there was a decline in access to cigarettes from commercial venues from 2000 to 2003. These findings are specific to the Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort study, a longitudinal telephone survey of youth less than 18 years old.

Hazards of CT scans overstated in NEJM
A recent article by Drs. David Brenner and Eric Hall in the New England Journal of Medicine has suggested that the radiation dose from CT scans is a cause for concern, and may be responsible for a small percentage of cancer deaths in the United States. While the conclusions of the Brenner article have been portrayed by some as conclusive, in reality the scientific community remains divided in regards to the radiation dose effects of CT.

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