Health Center

Health Center articles

Smoking may change genes in smokers
The fact that smoking means a considerable health risk is nowadays commonly accepted. New research findings from Uppsala University and Uppsala Clinical Research Center show that smoking alters several genes that can be associated with health problems for smokers, such as increased risk for cancer and diabetes.

Arsenic in rice and rice products is low
The levels FDA found in its testing are too low to cause immediate or short-term adverse health effects. FDA's work going forward will center on long-term risk and ways to manage it with a focus on long-term exposure.

Mentally stimulating activities boost brainpower in old age
New research suggests that reading books, writing and participating in brain-stimulating activities at any age may preserve memory. "Our study suggests that exercising your brain by taking part in activities such as these across a person's lifetime, from childhood through old age, is important for brain health in old age," said study author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Two more Autism Centers of Excellence funded
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $5.3 million in initial one-year funding to the latest two recipients of the Autism Centers of Excellence (ACE) program. With these awards, announced on World Autism Awareness Day, these and nine other ACE centers in US are now being funded for up to five years.

Fungal meningitis outbreak in US - 404 cases
Nine more people have been diagnosed with fungal meningitis in an outbreak linked to tainted steroid injections, health officials reported today. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has increased the tally of cases to 404 in 19 states.

Physical Inactivity becoming a Global Pandemic
The high prevalence and consequences of physical inactivity should be recognized as a global pandemic, according to a new publication by Harold W. Kohl, III, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology at The University of Texas School of Public Health, part of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Breast cancer funding restored by Komen Foundation to Planned Parenthood
The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation reversed its decision and continues to fund breast cancer screenings at Planned Parenthood health centers. The outpouring of support online for Planned Parenthood and women in need of breast cancer screenings has been nothing short of astonishing, and because of it, the Planned Parenthood Breast Health Fund has received more than $3 million from thousands of people across the country in only three days.

Susan G. Komen stops funding breast cancer programs at Planned Parenthood
Planned Parenthood Federation of America expressed deep disappointment in response to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation's decision to stop funding breast cancer prevention, screenings and education at Planned Parenthood health centers.

One million additional young adults get health insurance in US
Affordable Care Act has helped increase the number of young adults who have health insurance, as per data released by the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Obesity counseling should focus on neurobehavioral processes
Current approaches to dietary counseling for obesity are heavily rooted in the notion of personal choice and will power ? the ability to choose healthy foods and portion sizes consistent with weight loss while foregoing sweets and comfort foods. According to preventive medicine and behavioral experts at Rush University Medical Center, research supports a new counseling approach that views obesity as a result of neurobehavioral processes - ways in which the brain controls eating behavior in response to cues in the environment.

Shanghai Breast Health Resource Center China
The prevention, early detection and multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer are important strategies for promoting health and extending a healthy life span. The Shanghai Breast Health Resource Center is an important step in effectively addressing breast cancer, especially to improving breast cancer screening and early detection, which are considered to be the most effective and affordable ways for a rapid reduction of breast cancer disease burden in developing countries like China.

Medicaid plans owned by public companies have higher administrative costs
A new Commonwealth Fund report finds that Medicaid managed care plans that are owned by publicly traded for-profit companies whose primary line of business is managing Medicaid enrollees spent an average of 14 percent of premiums on administrative costs, compared with an average of only 10 percent spent by non-publicly traded plans owned by groups of health care providers, health systems, community health centers, or clinics.

Reducing diet in pregnancy may affect brain growth in fetus
Eating less during early pregnancy impaired fetal brain development in a nonhuman primate model, revealed by researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.

Natural plant sunscreen shows promise in preventing skin cancer
Maybe you worshipped the sun in your youth or weren't as meticulous as you should have been with sunscreen. If so, take heart: Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio are finding that certain plant substances, when given in combinations, may suppress damage that can cause skin cancer.

Indoor tanning linked to melanoma
New research from the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center definitively links the use of indoor tanning devices to increased risk of melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer.

Candy like nicotine products could lead to accidental poisoning
A tobacco company's new, dissolvable nicotine pellet--which is being sold as a tobacco product, but which in some cases resembles popular candies--could lead to accidental nicotine poisoning in children, according to a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), the Northern Ohio Poison Control Center, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Two new genes identified causing ankylosing spondylitis
Work done in part by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has led to the discovery of two new genes that are implicated in ankylosing spondylitis (AS), an inflammatory and potentially disabling disease.

Routine HIV screening in community boosts HIV testing
UCSF researchers have that found routinely offering rapid HIV tests to patients in community health centers can significantly increase the number of patients screened for HIV.

Rapamycin may extend lifespan of older
Rapamycin extended the expected lifespan of middle-aged mice by 28 percent to 38 percent, revealed by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Diabetes early signs in kids as young as 7
Research conducted under the direction of Melinda Sothern, PhD, Professor and Director of Health Promotion at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, showing early signs of diabetes in healthy children as young as seven years old will be presented at the American Diabetes Association 2009 Annual Scientific Session Meeting in New Orleans.

Voter attitudes on health care reform
Americans want answers to tough questions about the trade-offs involved in health care reform, according to new data released today by the Stanford Center on Longevity (SCL).

Folic acid may help treat allergies, asthma
Folic acid, or vitamin B9, essential for red blood cell health and long known to reduce the risk of spinal birth defects, may also suppress allergic reactions and lessen the severity of allergy and asthma symptoms, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

Macular degeneration cases would rise in near future
Health care providers can expect a significant increase in age-related macular degeneration as the baby boom generation reaches retirement age, according to a new study by researchers at RTI International and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Health spending growing faster than economic growth
Health spending in the United States grew 6.1 percent in 2007, to $2.2 trillion or $7,421 per person. This was the slowest rate of growth since 1998 and 0.6 of a percentage point lower than the growth of 6.7 percent in 2006, according to a report by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Blood sugar level linked to cognitive aging
Maintaining blood sugar levels, even in the absence of disease, may be an important strategy for preserving cognitive health, suggests a study published by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

Ginkgo biloba does not reduce dementia, Alzheimer's disease risk
The medicinal herb Ginkgo biloba does not reduce the risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease development in either the healthy elderly or those with mild cognitive impairment, according to a large multicenter trial led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Mothers less likely to vaccinate daughters against HPV
U.S. mothers report they are less likely to vaccinate daughters under age 13 against human papillomavirus virus (HPV), even though the vaccine is recommended for girls at age 11 and 12, it's incumbent upon the healthcare community to work to improve mom's acceptance of the vaccination for younger daughters, say researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center who conducted the study.

21% children not fully protected against vaccine-preventable diseases
The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW) last week.

28 Health Center articles listed above.


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