Urology

Urology - most related articles:

- New PSA test predicts if prostate cancer will return - 2.7
- Dense bones linked to prostate cancer risk - 2.5
- Age plays too big a role in prostate cancer treatment decisions - 2.4
- Income linked to prostate cancer grade - 2.3
- PSA screening awareness needed among high-risk groups - 2.2

Urology articles

Depression, behavior changes may be earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's disease
Depression and other behavior changes may show up in people who will later develop Alzheimer's disease even before they start having memory problems, reported by researchers in the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Concussions may be related to Alzheimer's disease
A history of concussion involving at least a momentary loss of consciousness may be related to the buildup of Alzheimer's-associated plaques in the brain, revealed by researchers in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Parkinson's disease risk higher due to exposure to pesticides
Exposure to pesticides, weed killers and solvents is likely to be associated with a higher risk for developing Parkinson's disease, revealed by researchers in the Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Stem cell transplant may restore memory
A study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the first to show that human stem cells can successfully implant themselves in the brain and then heal neurological deficits, says senior author Su-Chun Zhang, a professor of neuroscience and neurology.

Athletes with suspected concussion should be removed from play - AAN US
With more than one million athletes now experiencing a concussion each year in the United States, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has released an evidence-based guideline for evaluating and managing athletes with concussion. This new guideline replaces the 1997 AAN guideline on the same topic.

Buphenyl a possible drug for Alzheimer's disease
Buphenyl, an FDA-approved medication for hyperammonemia, may protect memory and prevent the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Hyperammonemia is a life-threatening condition that can affect patients at any age. It is caused by abnormal, high levels of ammonia in the blood.

Blocked heart arteries can cause stroke
Blockages in your heart arteries could mean you're more likely to have a stroke, even if you're considered low risk. A new study raises the need for intensified interdisciplinary efforts for providing adequate disease prevention and management strategies for stroke.

Multiple sclerosis - possible trigger for nerve damage
High-resolution real-time images show in mice how nerves may be damaged during the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis. The results suggest that the critical step happens when fibrinogen, a blood-clotting protein, leaks into the central nervous system and activates immune cells called microglia.

Stroke becoming more common in young people
Stroke may be affecting people at a younger age, revealed by researchers. "The reasons for this trend could be a rise in risk factors such as diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol," said study author Brett Kissela, MD, MS, with the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in Ohio and a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology.

High blood pressure in pregnancy may affect child's IQ
New research suggests that a mother's high blood pressure during pregnancy may have an effect on her child's thinking skills all the way into old age. The study is published in the Neurology.

Autism detected by computer analysis of EEG
Widely available EEG testing can distinguish children with autism from neurotypical children as early as age 2, finds a study from Boston Children's Hospital. The study investigated EEGs as a potential diagnostic tool for autism, and offers hope for an earlier, more definitive test.

Omega 3 fatty acids linked to aging and memory problems
A diet lacking in omega-3 fatty acids, nutrients commonly found in fish, may cause your brain to age faster and lose some of its memory and thinking abilities. Omega-3 fatty acids include the nutrients called docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

Migraine in mom may increase baby's risk of colic
Mothers who experience migraine may be more likely to have a baby with colic than mothers without a history of migraine. Colic is defined as excessive crying in an otherwise healthy infant.

Magnetic stimulation of brain may help stroke patients recover
Imagine waking up and being unable to see or recognize anything on the left side of your body. This condition, called hemispatial neglect, is common after a stroke that occurs on the right side of the brain.

PSA test helps predicting biopsy need and low risk prostate cancer
The prostate-specific antigen test, commonly known as the PSA test, is valuable in predicting which men should have biopsies and which are likely to be diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer, a Mayo Clinic study has found. The findings were released during a meeting of the North Central Section of the American Urological Association in Rancho Mirage, California, US.

Premature birth increases epilepsy risk later in life
Being born prematurely may increase your risk of developing epilepsy as an adult, revealed by researchers in a new study published in the Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Low vitamin B12 may lead to brain shrinkage and cognitive problems
Older people with low blood levels of vitamin B12 markers may be more likely to have lower brain volumes and have problems with their thinking skills, according to researchers at Rush University Medical Center.

Diabetes increases risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease
People with diabetes appear to be at a significantly increased risk of developing dementia, revealed by researchers in a recent study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

MS drugs help, but come at high cost
Multiple sclerosis drugs used to slow down the multiple sclerosis progression may help some patients, but at a very high cost. These disease modifying drugs ? come at a very high cost when compared to therapies that address the symptoms of MS and treatments for other chronic diseases.

Stress may not increase multiple sclerosis risk
Contrary to earlier reports, a new study finds that stress does not appear to increase a person's risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The research is published in the May_31, 2011, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Parkinson's disease risk for people exposed to pesticides near workplace
In April 2009, researchers at UCLA announced they had discovered a link between Parkinson's disease and two chemicals commonly sprayed on crops to fight pests. That epidemiological study didn't examine farmers who constantly work with pesticides but people who simply lived near where farm fields were sprayed with the fungicide maneb and the herbicide paraquat.

Low vitamin D levels seen as multiple sclerosis risk for African Americans
Vitamin D levels in the blood are lower in African Americans who have the disease, compared to African Americans who do not, revealed by researchers exploring the connection between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis in African Americans.

Memory problems often not present in middle aged people with Alzheimer's disease
A new study suggests more than half of people who develop Alzheimer's disease before the age of 60 are initially misdiagnosed as having other kinds of brain disease when they do not have memory problems.

Musical activity may improve cognitive aging
A study conducted by Brenda Hanna-Pladdy, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist in Emory's Department of Neurology, and cognitive psychologist Alicia MacKay, PhD, found that older individuals who spent a significant amount of time throughout life playing a musical instrument perform better on some cognitive tests than individuals who did not play an instrument.

Testosterone - prostate cancer link needs reevaluation
The long-standing prohibition against testosterone therapy in men with untreated or low-risk prostate cancer merits reevaluation, according to a new study published in The Journal of Urology.

Brain size predicts dementia in advance in Alzheimer's disease
Subtle differences in brain anatomy among older individuals with normal cognitive skills may be able to predict both the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in the following decade and how quickly symptoms of dementia would develop.

Stroke survivors with irregular heartbeat may have higher risk of dementia
Stroke survivors who have an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation may be at higher risk of developing dementia than stroke survivors who do not have the heart condition, according to research published in the March 8, 2011, print issue of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Eating berries may lower Parkinson's disease risk
New research shows men and women who regularly eat berries may have a lower risk of developing Parkinson's disease, while men may also further lower their risk by regularly eating apples, oranges and other sources rich in dietary components called flavonoids.

Stroke rate rises in HIV patients
While the overall hospitalization rate for stroke has declined in recent years, the numbers have jumped dramatically for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), suggesting they may be up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than people uninfected by the virus that causes AIDS.

Drugs for epilepsy increases fracture risk in older
Most anti-epileptic drugs are associated with an increased risk of non-traumatic fracture in individuals 50 years of age and older, revealed by researchers in a study published in the Archives of Neurology.

Statin may raise stroke risk in patients with brain hemorrhage
People with brain hemorrhage - a type of stroke - should avoid taking cholesterol lowering drugs called statins, revealed by researchers in US.

Pay more attention to epilepsy, affects millions of people
Epilepsy, a common and serious neurologic disorder that affects millions of people, is not getting the public attention and funding for research it deserves, according to an editorial on a study published in the January_4, 2011, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Mid life cholesterol levels not linked to Alzheimer's disease
Contrary to earlier research, a new, long-term study suggests that cholesterol level in mid-life may not be linked to later development of Alzheimer's disease.

Headaches in teens tied to overweight, smoking and lack of exercise
Teens who are overweight, get little exercise or who smoke may be more likely to have frequent headaches and migraines than teens with none of these factors, according to a study published in the August 18, 2010, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Dense bones linked to prostate cancer risk
Men who develop prostate cancer, especially the more aggressive and dangerous forms that spread throughout the body, tend to retain denser bones as they age than men who stay free of the disease, suggests new research from Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Depression may double risk of dementia & Alzheimer's disease
A new study shows that having depression may nearly double your risk of developing dementia later in life, revealed in a research published in the July 6, 2010, issue of Neurology.

Statins lower prostate cancer recurrence after prostatectomy
Men who use statins to lower their cholesterol are 30 percent less likely to see their prostate cancer come back after surgery compared to men who do not use the drugs, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. Researchers also found that higher doses of the drugs were associated with lower risk of recurrence.

Tests can predict falls in Parkinson's disease
A group of tests may help predict which people with Parkinson's disease are more likely to fall, according to a study published in the June 23, 2010, online issue of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Genes and Pesticide Exposure increases Parkinson's Disease risk
Genetic mutations and workplace exposure to some insecticides together appear to be associated with an increased risk for Parkinson's disease among men, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Brain imaging findings in Alzheimer's disease associated with genetic factors
By investigating the association between genetic loci related to Alzheimer's disease and neuroimaging measures related to disease risk, researchers may have uncovered additional evidence that several previously studied genetic variants are associated with the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease and also may have identified new genetic risk factors for further study, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

World leaders focus on stroke prevention, care
On the 40th anniversary of the journal Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, stroke leaders from around the world celebrated stroke research accomplishments and set an agenda for the future, according to a special report in the journal.

Abdominal fat at middle age linked to dementia
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine determined that excess abdominal fat places otherwise healthy, middle-aged people at risk for dementia later in life. Preliminary findings suggest a relationship between obesity and dementia that could lead to promising prevention strategies in the future.

Parkinson's disease treatments linked to compulsive behaviors
Pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, binge eating and other impulse control disorders appear to be more common among individuals taking dopamine agonist medications for Parkinson's disease, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Restless legs syndrome appears to occur within families
Restless legs syndrome appears to aggregate in families, and the siblings of those who are severely affected appear to have an increased risk of developing the disease, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Fluctuating blood pressure increases cerebrovascular disease risk
The risk of cerebrovascular diseases appears to be higher among individuals with fluctuating blood pressure in addition to high blood pressure, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Robotic therapy can improve limb movement years after stroke
Patients show modest yet meaningful gains in limb movement and an improved outlook on life years after suffering a stroke, a major clinical study has found.

New gene linked to Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have identified a gene that appears to increase a person's risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease, the most common type of Alzheimer's disease.

Smoking may increase multiple sclerosis risk
Smoking may increase the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) in people who also have specific established risk factors for MS. The research is found in the April_7, 2010, online issue of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Secondary stroke prevention needs improvement
New research finds that one out of 12 people who have a stroke will likely soon have another stroke, and one out of four will likely die within one year.

Sleepiness raises motor vehicle accidents in students
Sleepiness at the wheel and poor sleep quality significantly increase the risk of motor vehicle accidents in adolescents, revealed in a study in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Chocolate may lower stroke risk
Giving chocolates to your Valentine on February 14th may help lower their risk of stroke based on a preliminary study from researchers at St. Michael's Hospital.

Drinking milk during pregnancy lowers baby's risk of multiple sclerosis
Drinking milk during pregnancy may help reduce your baby's chances of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) as an adult, revealed by researchers.

Migraine may double risk of heart attack
People with migraine may be at an increased risk of heart attack and other risk factors for heart disease, according to a study published in the February 10, 2010, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Ampyra, dalfampridine approved for multiple sclerosis patients
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Ampyra (dalfampridine) extended release tablets to improve walking in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Weekend strokes may receive more aggressive treatment
Stroke patients admitted to the hospital on the weekend appear more likely to receive the clot-dissolving medication tissue plasminogen activator than patients admitted during the week. However, stroke death rates appear similar among weekend and weekday admissions.

Oxygen appears effective in treating cluster headache
Patients with a cluster headache, which is characterized by bouts of excruciating pain usually near the eye or temple, were more likely to report being pain-free within 15 minutes of treatment with high-flow oxygen than patients who received a placebo treatment.

Cannabis is beneficial for multiple sclerosis
Cannabis can reduce spasticity (involuntary muscle tension or contraction) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, revealed by researchers in a new study.

South Americans may have a higher stroke risk
US people born in the Southern stroke belt have a higher risk of dying from stroke as adults, even if they later move away, compared to people who were born in other parts of the country.

Ecstasy use may lead to sleep apnea
Recreational users of the drug known as ecstasy may be at a higher risk for sleep apnea, revealed by researchers.

Fat around the middle increases dementia risk in women
Women who store fat on their waist in middle age are more than twice as likely to develop dementia when they get older, reveals a new study from the Sahlgrenska Academy.

Reduced muscle strength increases Alzheimer's disease risk
Individuals with weaker muscles appear to have a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease and declines in cognitive function over time, revealed by the researchers.

Teenage obesity increases multiple sclerosis risk in women
Teenage women who are obese may be more than twice as likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) as adults compared to female teens who are not obese, revealed by researchers.

Poor money management indicates Alzheimer's disease
New research finds poor money management skills may indicate that a person with mild memory problems will soon develop Alzheimer's disease, revealed by researchers in a new research study.

High blood pressure causes memory problems in middle age
High blood pressure is linked to memory problems in people over 45, according to research published in the August 25, 2009, print issue of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Smoking increases brain lesions and brain shrinkage in MS
People who smoke and have multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at increased risk of brain shrinkage and increased brain lesions related to the disease, revealed by researchers.

Exercise helps stroke patients recover faster
A person who has exercised regularly prior to the onset of a stroke appears to recover more quickly, say researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida, USA, in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Sinai Hospital of Baltimore ranked as one of top US hospitals
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore is ranked as one of the top hospitals in the country for neurology and neurosurgery, according to the U.S. News & World Report's 2009-10 America's Best Hospitals edition.

Children with chronic daily headache may improve with time
Most children who suffer from chronic daily headache may outgrow the disabling condition, revealed by researchers. Nearly 1.5 percent of middle school children are affected by chronic daily headache, which includes chronic migraines and tension-type headaches.

Smoking leads to rapid progression of multiple sclerosis
Patients with multiple sclerosis who smoke appear to experience a more rapid progression of their disease, revealed by researchers in the Archives of Neurology.

Educated patients with Parkinson's disease start treatment early
Individuals who have higher levels of education and who are more impaired by Parkinson's disease appear to require treatment for their symptoms earlier than do other patients, revealed by researchers.

White matter changes may predict dementia risk
Elderly people with no memory or thinking problems are more likely to later develop thinking problems if they have a growing amount of "brain rust," or small areas of brain damage, revealed by researchers.

Intellectual ability test in early 20s may predict dementia risk
People who have superior language skills early in life may be less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease decades later, despite having the hallmark signs of the disease, revealed by researchers.

Depression may increase Alzheimer's disease risk
People with memory problems who are depressed are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease compared to people who are not depressed, revealed by US researchers.

Cognitive impairment linked to reduced survival in US
Alzheimer's disease and its precursor, mild cognitive impairment, appear to be associated with an increased risk of death among both white and African American older adults according to a new, long-term research study by neurological experts at the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center.

Breastfeeding reduces multiple sclerosis relapse in women
Women with multiple sclerosis who breastfeed exclusively for at least two months appear less likely to experience a relapse within a year after their baby's birth, according to a report that will appear in the August print issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Second stroke often follows within hours of first
About half of all people who have a major stroke following a warning stroke (a transient ischemic attack or mild stroke) have it within 24 hours of the first event, according to research published in the June 2, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Stroke treatment can benefit patients up to 4.5 hours
Once symptoms start, there's only a tiny window of time for stroke victims to get life-saving treatment. Now, research from the Stanford University School of Medicine has cracked that window open a bit wider.

Statins may help prevent stroke recurrence
People who take cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins after a stroke may be less likely to have another stroke later, according to research published in the May 26, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Menopause transition may cause trouble learning
The largest study of its kind to date shows that women may not be able to learn as well shortly before menopause compared to other stages in life. The research is published in the May 26, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Prevalence of variant CJD agent in Britain remains uncertain
First results from a large tissue survey in Britain of the agent that causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) are unable so far to establish that the prevalence is lower than that given by previous estimates, concludes a study published on bmj.com.

Vitamin D in fish boosts brain power
Eating fish ? long considered ?brain food' ? may really be good for the old grey matter, as is a healthy dose of sunshine, new research suggests.

3 minute quick test for prostate cancer
A new 3-minute test could help in diagnosing prostate cancer, the most common cancer in men in the UK, according to scientists. Researchers have developed the test by using light energy to measure the level of citrate in fluid samples from the prostate gland.

Triglycerides implicated in diabetes nerve loss
A common blood test for triglycerides ? a well-known cardiovascular disease risk factor ? may also for the first time allow doctors to predict which patients with diabetes are more likely to develop the serious, common complication of neuropathy.

Alzheimer's disease risk index predicts Alzheimer's in elderly
A new tool can help predict whether people age 65 and older have a high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Research on the tool is published in the May 13, 2009, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Prostate surgery improves younger prostate cancer patients survival
For men younger than 50 with prostate cancer, undergoing a radical prostatectomy can greatly increase their chances for long-term survival, according to a new study from Henry Ford Hospital.

New pill cladribine to treat Multiple sclerosis MS
A new drug for multiple sclerosis can dramatically reduce the chances of a relapse or a deterioration of the condition, according to a new study from researchers at Queen Mary, University of London.

Pain relievers seem not to prevent Alzheimer's disease
A new study shows that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as the pain relievers ibuprofen and naproxen do not prevent Alzheimer's disease, but they may instead delay its onset.

Meth use during pregnancy linked to abnormal brain in baby
A first of its kind study examining the effects of methamphetamine use during pregnancy has found the drug appears to cause abnormal brain development in children.

SAP a new therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease
New therapeutic approaches in Alzheimer's disease are urgently needed. Work led by Professor Mark Pepys FRS over more than 20 years has identified a protein known as serum amyloid P component (SAP) as a possible therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease.

Headache and migraine linked to hot weather, air pollution
Higher temperatures, and to a lesser degree, lower barometric pressure, contribute to severe headaches, revealed by researchers in issue of the journal Neurology.

Parkinson's disease linked to melanoma in family
People with a family history of melanoma may have a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 61st Annual Meeting in Seattle, April 25 to May 2, 2009.

Mediterranean diet improves cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease
Eating a Mediterranean diet appears to be associated with less risk of mild cognitive impairment-a stage between normal aging and dementia-or of transitioning from mild cognitive impairment into Alzheimer's disease.

Dementia not in socially active old people
A new study shows that people who are socially active and not easily stressed may be less likely to develop dementia.

Hormone therapy HRT may shrink brain
Two new studies show that hormone therapy for women is linked to brain shrinkage, but not to the small brain lesions that are the first sign of cerebrovascular disease.

Blood sugar level linked to cognitive aging
Maintaining blood sugar levels, even in the absence of disease, may be an important strategy for preserving cognitive health, suggests a study published by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

Sleep disorder - an early sign of dementia, Parkinson's disease
People with a sleep disorder that causes them to kick or cry out during their sleep may be at greater risk of developing dementia or Parkinson's disease, revealed by researchers.

MRI shows signs of multiple sclerosis before disease develops
With more and more people having brain MRIs for various reasons, doctors are finding people whose scans show signs of multiple sclerosis (MS) even though they have no symptoms of the disease.

Ginkgo biloba does not reduce dementia, Alzheimer's disease risk
The medicinal herb Ginkgo biloba does not reduce the risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease development in either the healthy elderly or those with mild cognitive impairment, according to a large multicenter trial led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Secret of sharp memory in old age revealed
Researchers at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine wondered if the brains of the elderly with still laser sharp memory -- called "super aged" -- were somehow different than everyone else's.

Ischemic stroke increases with higher nonfasting triglyceride level
Elevated nonfasting triglyceride levels, previously associated with an increased risk for heart attack, also appear to be associated with an increased risk for ischemic stroke.

Education level linked to Alzheimer's disease, dementia
Individuals with higher education levels appear to score higher on cognitive tests despite having evidence of brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Statins do not increase risk of Lou Gehrig's Disease
A U.S. Food and Drug Administration's analysis provides new evidence that the use of statins does not increase incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease often referred to as "Lou Gehrig's Disease." The analysis was reported on Monday, Sept. 29, 2008 in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.

Family history of brain tumors raises brain cancer risk
People with a family history of cancerous brain tumors appear to be at higher risk of developing the same kind of tumors compared to people with no such family history, according to a study published in the September 23, 2008, issue of Neurology?, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Migraine linked to blood clots in veins, venous thrombosis
People with migraines may also be more likely to develop blood clots in their veins, and are more likely to have strokes and other cardiovascular problems, revealed by researchers.

PET scans useful to assess Alzheimer's disease
A type of positron emission tomography (PET) scanning may be useful in a non-invasive assessment of the formation of Alzheimer's disease?related plaques in the brain, according to small study posted online today that will appear in the October 2008 print issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Eating fish may prevent memory loss and stroke in old age
Eating tuna and other types of fish may help lower the risk of cognitive decline and stroke in healthy older adults, according to a study published in the August 5, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Epilepsy drug topiramate during pregnancy raises birth defects risk
Taking the epilepsy drug topiramate alone or along with other epilepsy drugs during pregnancy may increase the risk of birth defects, according to a study published in the July 22, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Exercise may prevent Early Alzheimer's disease
Mild Alzheimer's disease patients with higher physical fitness had larger brains compared to mild Alzheimer's patients with lower physical fitness, according to a study published in the July 15, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Pesticides may lead to Parkinson's disease
The association between Parkinson's disease and exposure to pesticides has been shown in patients with the neurological disorder compared with their unaffected relatives, according to a study in the online open access journal BMC Neurology.

Obesity in midlife increases dementia risk
People in their 40s with larger stomachs have a higher risk for dementia when they reach their 70s, according to a study published in the March 26, 2008, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Psychological distress linked to increased risk of stroke
Psychological distress, but not depression, may increase the risk of stroke, according to a study published in the March_4, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Previous studies have shown that stroke often leads to depression, but the evidence was mixed as to whether depression could lead to stroke.

Does ginkgo biloba affect memory?
Taking the supplement ginkgo biloba had no clear-cut benefit on the risk of developing memory problems, according to a study published in the February 27, 2008, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Clot busting treatment effective if given in 6 hours after a stroke
The study, co-ordinated by the Royal Melbourne Hospital and conducted by the Australasian Stroke Trialists Network including the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Stroke Research Group demonstrates that clot busting (thrombolysis) treatment can be effective when administered up to six hours after a stroke.

Daytime dozing increases stroke risk in elderly
Regular daytime dozing forewarns of a significantly increased risk of stroke in older Americans, researchers reported at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2008.

Do animals think like autistic savants?
When Temple Grandin argued that animals and autistic savants share cognitive similarities in her best-selling book Animals in Translation (2005), the idea gained steam outside the community of cognitive neuroscientists.

Stem cells may aid stroke recovery
Neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells helped repair stroke-related damage in the brains of rats and led to improvements in their physical abilities, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Marijuana smoking impairs cognition in multiple sclerosis patients
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) who smoke marijuana are more likely to have emotional and memory problems, according to research published February 13, 2008, in the online edition of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Oxcarbazepine doesn't help prevent migraine after all
Contrary to some reports, the epilepsy drug oxcarbazepine does not appear to prevent migraine, according to research published in the February 12, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

New MS drug rituximab shows promise for multiple sclerosis
A drug therapy, using rituximab, dramatically reduced the number of inflammatory lesions that form along nerve fibers in brains of multiple sclerosis patients, revealed by researchers recently.

Parkinson's disease risk reduced with high blood pressure drugs
Parkinson's disease risk is reduced in people taking drugs known as calcium channel blockers to treat high blood pressure, revealed by researchers in US.

Vitamin B12, folate deficiency raises dementia risk
Folate deficiency is associated with a tripling in the risk of developing dementia among elderly people, suggests research published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry.

Deep brain stimulation may improve memory
A new study found that hypothalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery performed in the treatment of a patient with morbid obesity unexpectedly evoked detailed autobiographical memories.

Ortho Evra contraceptive transdermal birth control patch label update
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved additional changes to the Ortho Evra Contraceptive Transdermal (Skin) Patch label to include the results of a new epidemiology study that found that users of the birth control patch were at higher risk of developing serious blood clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), than women using birth control pills. VTE can lead to pulmonary embolism.

Statins, cholesterol lowering drugs may not prevent Alzheimer's Disease
Taking statins, which are cholesterol-lowering drugs, offers no protection against Alzheimer's disease, revealed by US researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Novel anti-cancer strategy moves to clinic
Researchers at Emory University have developed a novel anti-tumor compound that represents a distinct strategy: targeting one of the most important "intercept points" for cancer cells.

Restless legs syndrome doubles risk of stroke and heart disease
People with restless legs syndrome (RLS) are twice as likely to have a stroke or heart disease compared to people without RLS, and the risk is greatest in those with the most frequent and severe symptoms.

Musician's dystonia improved by stimulating hand muscles
Stimulating the hand muscles may help treat the condition called musician's dystonia. Musician's dystonia - a focal dystonia is a nerological movement disorder that causes muscles spasms in musicians.

Early treatment stops epilepsy seizures
It is possible to suppress the development of epilepsy in genetically predisposed animals revealed by Yale School of Medicine researchers. This new study would open the door to treating epilepsy as a preventable disease.

Combination therapy and antibiotics may help multiple sclerosis patients
A preliminary study suggests that combining a medication currently used to treat multiple sclerosis with an antibiotic may slow the progress of the disease, according to an article posted online today that will appear in the February 2008 print issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

129 Urology articles listed above.


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